What is the history of the development of the camera?

What is the history of the development of the camera? Loose leaf film camera, also known as landline, vertical camera, and large format camera. The landline is the abbreviation of the landline camera (the same below). The fuselage is mostly a wooden camera, with a seat, mounted on a special tripod. There is a retractable leather cavity in front of the dark box (with the help of guide rail zoom), and a lens is installed in the front of the leather cavity (mostly a shutter between the mirrors). There is frosted glass (reverse image) behind the dark box, which is used to observe the scene and focus on the composition. After focusing, load the film and expose it. In the early days of photography, cameras had a large area, and they were all landlines. Dry plates (glass plates and metal plates coated with photosensitive materials) were first used, and then film was used. The film is a single sheet, that is, a sheet (packed in a cassette, one shot at a time). The thickness of the base is about 250-500 microns. The main frame sizes are 6 inches (6.5*4.5), 8 inches (8.5*6.5), 5 inches * 4 inches, 7 inches * 5 inches, 10 inches * 8 inches, 12 inches * 10 inches, etc. The frame can be large or small, which is obviously better than the 120 camera and 135 camera, which is the main reason why it has been used until now. The landline is divided into indoor and outdoor, ordinary and professional ‘single track and double track. The lens plane and the film plane can be swayed and translated, and can be used for tilt-shift shooting. The main brands are Schneider, Rodonstead and so on. Large and bulky are its disadvantages.

What is the history of the development of the camera?
What is the history of the development of the camera?

120 camera, also known as medium format camera. One side of the imaging frame is a 60mm camera. Eastman Kodak Company was established in 1901, and 120 film rolls were introduced that year. There are three main types of 120 cameras: folding, dual-lens reflex, and single-lens reflex. After the birth of the digital camera, a single-lens reflex type film digital dual-purpose 120 camera with a replaceable back appeared. The traditional 120 camera imaging carrier is film, and the base thickness is 120 microns, hence the name. However, the thickness of the contemporary 120 film base is no longer 120 microns. The format of the 120 camera is 6 cm * 6 cm (standard format), 6 cm * 4.5 cm, 6 cm * 12 cm (for 612 cameras), 6 cm * 17 cm (for 617 cameras), etc. Shortly after the advent of the digital camera in 1981, the 120 digital camera was born. The imaging carrier is a sensor, the long side of the full frame is 60 mm wide, and the long side of the non-full frame is less than 60 mm.

What is the history of the development of the camera?

135 camera, also known as small format camera, has a 24 mm camera on one side of the imaging format. In 1913 (or 1914), Oskar Bar Nark of Zeiss Microscopy Factory in Germany developed a 135 camera (Leica Ur-Leica) using 35mm motion picture film. 135 cameras mainly include head-up rangefinder viewfinder and single-lens reflex viewfinder. The traditional 135 camera imaging carrier is film, and the base thickness is 135 microns, so it is called a 135 camera. The base thickness of contemporary 135 cameras is no longer 135 microns. Another way of saying that is that when a Leica camera using 35mm motion picture film was produced in Germany, in order to distinguish it from motion picture film, a “1” was added before 35 to make 135. There is also a saying that when Kodak introduced 135 color film in 1935, it defined 135 film as “35mm film in a primary cassette.” The format of the 135 camera is 24 mm * 36 mm (standard format), 24 mm * 18 mm (for half-frame cameras), 24 mm * 72 mm (for wide format cameras), etc. Soon after the advent of the digital camera in 1981, the 135 digital camera was born. The imaging carrier is a sensor, the short side of the full frame is 24 mm wide, and the short side of the non-full frame is less than 24 mm.

What is the history of the development of the camera?

 

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